The Raven: Legacy of a Master Thief and a Blog Update

First, the blog update. My domain is set to expire in September and I’m not going to renew it. I do, however, plan to continue the blog. Since I’m not going to renew my domain the URL will change to flamingbard.wordpress.com  instead of flamingbard.com. I plan on switching over to the wordpress address September 1st and will tweet the link a couple times as well as post on my Google+ profile as well. I’m also playing with changing the templates and trying to update things like the blog roll (it won’t show the way *I* want it to … blarg) but so far haven’t found any one system I really like. Hopefully I’ll get that sorted very soon as I’m tired of how it currently looks.

‘The Raven – Legacy of a Master Thief’ is a thrilling crime adventure in three episodes from the creators of ‘The Book of Unwritten Tales’. Full of twists and turns, it immerses you in both sides of the story, combining thrill-of-the-chase whodunit with the risk and reward of a heist story. Paris, 1960. – (From the Steam store page for this game)

Raven_starting

I pre-ordered The Raven – Legacy of a Master Thief during the Steam Sale this summer and have played through chapter one, The Eye of the Sphinx, twice now. This game, developed and released by KING Art and Nordic Games (they also did The Book of Unwritten Tales) is a beautifully painted story (circa 1964) of thievery, murder and obsession that starts you out on The Orient Express as you travel through the beautiful Swiss Alps on your way to Venice where you find yourself on a cruise ship bound for Cairo. The main character, an affable Swiss policeman, Constable Zellner, is a delight to play and I’ve enjoyed his character so much, I’ve actually dreamed I was Zellner in the game. (weird to dream about a game your playing but the story in this one can pull you in and make you think about it, even when you aren’t playing)

This was a rather challenging puzzle. Finishing audio made it worth the challenge though.

This was a rather challenging puzzle. Finishing audio made it worth the challenge though.

In the run up to release one of the things they were touting about this game was the level of difficulty on the puzzles and they used The Testament of Sherlock Holmes as an example. Some of the puzzles in the Sherlock game were SO INCREDIBLY HARD they were WAY TO HARD!! The Raven boasted the puzzles would be organic to the story (and, they are) and much easier to solve (again, they are). I think they went to the opposite extreme, however, where Frogwares went incredi-hard Nordic Games went incredi-simple. I’d like to see a mix falling somewhere in-between. Give me a challenge but don’t require that I know every possible move in a game of chess to solve a puzzle. Also, like in the Sherlock game, there were a couple of times where you’re presented with a puzzle but no direction to give you a clue as to what you’re supposed to do. It’s a little frustrating when finding yourself in that position but I wouldn’t say it’s hard.

Chapter two, Ancestry of Lies, releases this Tuesday, August 27th. I AM SO EXCITE! When I played through the first chapter the first time I finished and realized I’d missed some of the Steam (and Raptr, same achievements on both) achievements and knew I’d want to play through again before the second chapter was ready. I’ve been doing so, my second run through, the last few days and BOY HOWDY did I miss a lot. What I’ve found neat is that on my second run through the story presents with (sometimes) different dialogue based on my conversation choices. Definitely filled in some gaps for me! I finished my second run through today and found I’m still missing one achievement but, for now, I’m cool with that.

Raven_ch1finish

 

I can’t wait to see what happens next as Chapter one finished with a surprising climax that birthed quite a few new questions/possibilities. I’m still feeling burnt on the whole MMO thing (though, I do plan to play LotRO this week to help with the fundraising in The Shire for Landroval) and this type of single-player who-dun-it thriller story is both refreshing and satisfying. There’s no grinding, no repeatables, no over-flowing inventories … just a great story, pretty graphics and a compelling need to answer the question, WHO IS THE RAVEN???

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Posted on August 25, 2013, in blog update, Gaming and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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